Fishy Friends

Once again, in haste, due to rough conditions. A couple of days yet before it is due to calm down.

I have really enjoyed the company of my fishy companions these last few days. Whether they are teeming around my boat, leaping into the air, or creating a frenzy at the surface of the ocean, they have become a constant and endlessly entertaining presence. A bit like the booby birds were on the mid-Pacific, but a lot less smelly. Quite possibly also more intelligent – surely impossible to be less so.

I am not sure I’m going to be able to eat fish again. It’s a tough one, as I already eat very little meat or poultry, for reasons environmental, ethical, and health-conscious. I never choose meat in restaurants, but do occasionally eat it when I am a houseguest. I have also given up shrimp and farmed salmon because they are so damaging to the marine environment.

Now it looks like it will be a show-down between my conscience and my tastebuds over fish in general. Will I ever again be able to contemplate a delicious fish fillet without thinking of my fine fishy friends?

Other Stuff:

Boatfillers galore today, but when not up to my ankles in water, it has been a pleasant and productive day out here on the big blue.

I spoke to Mum Sunday afternoon. She is off to the hospital tomorrow to see the specialist about her broken leg. Hopefully he will say they can take the cast off. And we then hope that she might be well enough, soon enough, to come out and see me make landfall. Please join me in wishing Mum all the very best at the consultation, and hoping she gets out of that cast pronto!

Joke for the day (as a change from a quote):
Q: How many surrealists does it take to change a lightbulb?
A: Fish

Sponsored Miles: Thanks to Nick Perdiew, Stephanie Batzer and Hans Verwey for continuing support for Roz.

19 Comments

  • I am extraordinarily patient, provided I get my own way in the end.
    –Margaret Thatcher
    I seem to smell the stench of appeasement in the air.
    –Margaret Thatcher

    This is obviously a shameless, multi-pronged approach to getting Roz to stay awhile in Northern California and also give thanks to those that currently support Roz here (and for those that would be visiting) and also good information to share with potential Roz supporters…

     How to get to my favorite hidden hikes and boating destinations here in NorCal!

    http://www.outside-365.blogspot.com

    Row Roz Row!

    Cheers all!

    ~Jay

  • Hay Roz!  What’s the difference between a duck?
                     One of it’s legs are both the same.
    Happy Rowing,   Stephen

  • Heck of a quandary Roz, about the fishy friends. Have to try ‘eeny meeny miny mo’ maybe…?
    And Roz’ Mum, all the best for the consult. Here’s to saying ‘adios’ to the cast.
    Row well Roz… 

  • Heck of a quandary Roz, about the fishy friends. Have to try ‘eeny meeny miny mo’ maybe…?
    And Roz’ Mum, all the best for the consult. Here’s to saying ‘adios’ to the cast.
    Row well Roz… 

  • One thing to consider when thinking of giving up fish and other animals as food.  We are all part of a cycle that in one way or another requires that each one of us die and eventually return ourselves to the earth as nourishment.  The key is really about the excess in the way modern humans gather, grow, and consume our foods.  We could all do with eating less of many things and we could all do with participating in sustainable means of food production rather than the wasteful industrial, factory, forms.

    I used to be vegetarian (12-years), vegan (2-years) for a time, and in the end went back to eating meat because a) my body responded better to having meat in my diet than not;   b)  my realization that even if I remained vegetarian I was still contributing to the process by raising grains and providing pasture for livestock.  At that point I realized it is the excess and the method rather than simply the fact of eating meat.

    Someday I will be worm food, nourishment for bacteria, plant food, and perhaps even some of the minerals in my body will end up in rocks.  The cycle is one of birth – life – death – and around again.

  • One thing to consider when thinking of giving up fish and other animals as food.  We are all part of a cycle that in one way or another requires that each one of us die and eventually return ourselves to the earth as nourishment.  The key is really about the excess in the way modern humans gather, grow, and consume our foods.  We could all do with eating less of many things and we could all do with participating in sustainable means of food production rather than the wasteful industrial, factory, forms.

    I used to be vegetarian (12-years), vegan (2-years) for a time, and in the end went back to eating meat because a) my body responded better to having meat in my diet than not;   b)  my realization that even if I remained vegetarian I was still contributing to the process by raising grains and providing pasture for livestock.  At that point I realized it is the excess and the method rather than simply the fact of eating meat.

    Someday I will be worm food, nourishment for bacteria, plant food, and perhaps even some of the minerals in my body will end up in rocks.  The cycle is one of birth – life – death – and around again.

  • I shouted “Row, Roz, Row! … Row, Roz Savage, Row!” at the topof my lungs on a 12,000′ ridge in Yosemite, hoping to get an echo or perchance your reply …. I didn’t see the three hikers descending toward me, who happened to be from Spain and Mexico City. I asked if they thought I was crazy, but they did not understand my shout … so I explained. You may have 2 or 3 new fans, Roz!

    If they are reading this now, it was so nice to meet you on Mt. Dana!

    Row crazily, Roz!!

    • Well that explains it. I thought I heard something funny from here in Sacramento. It sounded like “floss beverage!” 

  • I am reluctant to eat anything that comes from the sea because the seafood industries are so irresponsible. The same way that I try to eat local from small farmers I would love to support people who go out and fish, but don’t know anyone at the moment.  When I retire and live by the sea I will respectfully and gratefully go fishing.

    Sending Reiki to your Mom.

  • Roz, I was thinking about your fishy predicament. I suggest that you just eat them if you want. Seriously. You’re over-analyzing. They are, after all, just FISH. This is coming from a strict vegan who avoids leather etc. I guess in the larger scheme of things it’s more about the statement. But in your situation, this is exactly how we should use ocean resources–take only what we need and be aware of the connections between our dinner plate and the natural world. You are not an industrial trawler. 

    A Native American tribe here in Northern California living on the McCloud River was once a salmon-dependent culture. Shasta Dam, built in 1943?, blocked the salmon runs and decimated that culture. Recently the tribe flew to New Zealand to meet the specific type of salmon that used to run into their territory because it no longer occurs in California, but it’s in NZ because it was transplanted there before Shasta Dam. The tribe acknowledged the reciprocity between people and food. They respect the salmon and they also eat the salmon. 

  • Thank you to concerned well-wishers. I am now free of any restrictions to my movement, and feel pretty good about it. Just need to get working at being a bit more supple and mobile. A real possibility that when Roz arrives somewhere, I can be there to meet her. Grateful for your support, Rita.

  • I was interested to see this post shortly after your photo with Sylvia Earle, also one of my heroes. 

    I went to hear her speak a few years ago.  To my surprise, her entire lecture was on why not to eat fish.  It was very, very compelling.  We over fish those fish we target, sending them into decline.  Other animals that eat those fish then go hungry, as leave so little behind, so even fish we aren’t targeting are terribly impacted by our over fishing.  And of course, the issue of by catch.

    After listening to Earle speak, I never ate another fish, and I’ve never regretted it.  Yes it can be hard, but it also feels good to do something good for the ocean every time I sit down to eat.

    Here’s Sylvia’s notes on why she thinks people should take a pass on fish;

    http://slog.thestranger.com/slog/archives/2009/05/19/sylvia-earle-says-stop-eating-fish

    Being a vegetarian can be a great life for us fish lovers!

    Jenny Hile

Leave a Reply to Eric Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *