A photo from the archives: Sedna as she was the first time I ever saw her. January 2005.

I was tremendously honoured to receive an award for “Ocean Inspiration Through Adventure” at an event held a few days ago in New York. The event was to commemorate the legacy and life of Jacques Cousteau, and was organized by his granddaughter, Celine. My friend Margaret Lydecker of New York Green Drinks accepted the award on my behalf, as it was tricky for me to get the night off from rowing across the Indian Ocean.

When I was at school or in the Girl Guides, an award was something you received when you’d completed a task, and when it comes to the oceans, the task is so very far from completed. At times it feels like it has barely begun. Critically endangered seafood is still served up in restaurants and sold in supermarkets, tons of rubbish still finds its way into oceans every day, only a tiny proportion of the total ocean area is protected, and ocean acidification caused by excess carbon dioxide continues to threaten all of ocean life as we know it.

But at least these awards show appreciation for those who fight on behalf of our oceans – and there are many out there doing so much more than I am. Awards help encourage the battle weary, and put fresh vigour into campaigns.

And so we keep pushing on, one oarstroke at a time….

Other Stuff:

Today was another rough, tough one. My boat was besieged by boatfillers, juggernauts, and other hostile wave varieties. I would find this easier to tolerate if it meant I was whizzing briskly across the ocean, but progress continues to be slow. The waves seem to suck me backwards almost as much as they push me forwards.

The temperature has dropped too. So far it had been remarkably comfortable and pleasant – usually between 75 and 90 degrees. But today was distinctly chilly, and I wore my neoprene booties for the first time.

A thought for someone who wants a challenge: before his premature death, Timothy Ray had planned to swim the length of California, stopping off along the way to talk to students about climate change. It sounds like an amazing and ambitious plan. Now that Tim is gone, wouldn’t it be fantastic if somebody else decided to take it on as a tribute?

Thanks for the feedback on wind gauges. Okay, I’ll use the finger-in-the-air / British ensign wind gauge for now!

Sponsored Miles:

Gail Brownell, Suwin Chan – thank you!

21 Comments

  •  Hi Roz,

    Re your thoughts at http://rozroams.squarespace.com/podcast/2011/5/19/episode-32-purple-prevailing.html on social media: I concur – I think you have your head around the issue well. Your main bonus is that whatever medium you are broadcasting and conversing on, you have unique, real and interesting content (IMO). Sorry that is all I have for you from this geek; your chat with Vic on other topics: weather, birds, food, is even more interesting to me, eg …

    The weather on the http://www.oceanweather.com/ website that Vic put in the show notes indicates a huge south-easterly system from Australia to the NW Indian ocean and Middle East. Sorry to hear that you are getting the opposite. Presumably that will not last for long, before you are rolling forward again.

    Rock on, Roz. 🙂

  • “A thought for someone who wants a challenge: before his premature death,
    Timothy Ray had planned to swim the length of California, stopping off
    along the way to talk to students about climate change. It sounds like
    an amazing and ambitious plan. Now that Tim is gone, wouldn’t it be
    fantastic if somebody else decided to take it on as a tribute?” HEY, HEY, HEY! Why don’t some of Roz’ West Coast Rozlings collaborate on this and do it as “They World’s Longest Relay Race” or the like – Get it sanctioned by Guiness, and do it for Tim, his causes and ours?

  • Damn Typos – “…”The World’s Longest Relay Race” or the like…”

    I’ve got Coffee in-hand
    Ring Up The Band
    Roz paddles-on without Blues
    In Spite Of Watery Push-Me-Pull-Yous
    Day-Dreaming of her first sight of land

    • I’ve been told that you Americans don’t have decent coffee over there, Richard! One reason I’ve never visited your part of the world. 

      •  @9ded466cb37f14648c547bf3da0e14bf:disqus Aww Sweets, There are good Coffees here – from (Relatively) small companies like “Peets” (And they ship) – Their Major Dickenson’s is SPECTACULAR (And, Their Decaf “Special Blend” is the best Decaf I have ever had)… And then one of America’s Oldest Coffee Companies – 8 O’clock Brand – “Original” (which is available around the world in supermarkets) is a wonderful and inexpensive blend that has not changed in over 100 years because it is so good… That is what I am drinking these post-comatose/pre-settlement tight economic days… Yummy… (I blend it with half of their Decaf Original – and you don’t notice the difference at all.)

  • Congratulations on the award, Roz.
    That British ensign flag must be made of tuff stuff to withstand the wind – a bit like she who rows beneath her! 

  •  Hi Roz! I have been loving reading your blog and listening to your podcast as usual. I look back on the last three years and marvel what has happened because of your choice to make this amazing journey. I know I am a better educated, more aware and environmentally careful human because I know you. Plus, thinking about all those oar strokes gets me out of bed some days! 

    I would like to dedicate my next blog to you. The blog subject will be about facing our fears. Why do we give up and let our fears convince us not to go and do that which we dream of doing or being who we know we can fully be? It is apparent that you have the found the answer to this question and you keep on, keeping on… being happy doing what you love, and inspiring others to do the same… FEARLESS. 
    http://www.navigatorgaia.blogspot.com 
    It will be posted in June. (I am looking for footage of our time in Dallas) BTW, the movie is completed and it’s amazing! Can’t wait to give you a special showing. 

    I love the names you have for different kinds of waves. Wish you didn’t have to get battered around so much, though! Hang in there and know we are all wishing efficient winds for you.

    Your friend in ATX!
    Rochelle

  • Congratulations on the award, Roz! I guess this is the ceremony that got postponed from the fall?

    We just returned from vacation. Michelle and Jeremy joined us for a couple days, and we went kayaking on Tybee Creek, where we paddled alongside small groups of dolphins, 10 or 12 total. A fantastic time. Wish you could have been there with us. 

  • Brava, Roz!  International recognition of you and your causes is what will help bring humanity to a tipping point of change from our unsustainable practices to sustainable balance.

    It has been 31 years since the very first Earth Day, and I feel we are approaching a critical mass to actually reach the end of the beginning, and the beginning of the “end game” of serious solutions to bringing the era Anthropocene into control from being an out-of-control orgy of unfettered consumption of resources, depleting what rightly belongs to future generations.

    To quote a song written in 1970 by Paul Williams and performed by Karen and Richard Carpenter, “We’ve only just begun” to address the issue you describe: “Critically endangered seafood is still served up in restaurants and sold in supermarkets, tons of rubbish still finds its way into oceans every day, only a tiny proportion of the total ocean area is protected, and ocean acidification caused by excess carbon dioxide continues to threaten all of ocean life as we know it.”

    Row to promote life on earth, Roz!

    • I just realized that I mentioned “Anthropocene” above, which may be unfamiliar to some Rozlings. If you want to learn what that is, watch Will Steffen’s TEDx talk http://bit.ly/TEDxAnthropocene

      Prof. Steffens is “Executive Director of the Australian National University’s Climate Change Institute… [He starts out by saying, “For those of you expecting a talk on climate change, actually thankfully, you won’t get it. I’m gonna talk about this rather broader term….”] He takes us on a journey through the science measuring humanity’s effect on the planet. Using tangible, real measures, Will shows us the profound change in the planet since the Industrial Revolution and argues that now, more than at any other time, humanity is the single most influential factor in global changes; so much so that we should recognise that now is the age of mankind – The Anthropocene.”

  • Roz, just to let you know we are following you. Great news about the award. Martin, Amanda, Abi and Cam

  • Yes, indeed: Congratulations, Roz. A well deserved accolade. And there will be more to come.

    Seeing the original Sedna reminds me that the story of her evolution would be very interesting. When you have time to spare, of course!

  • Hey Roz, Congratulations on your amazing achievements! We are the current owners of Steamy Windows and marvel at all you have been through since you sailed aboard her in 2005! We salute you and wish you fair winds and smooth seas to the end of your journey. Steamy Windows is now is Brisbane, Australia, after we sailed her out of the UK in 2006! What a crew she has had! All the best, Team Steamy (Caylie David Will and Kitty)

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